How Penn State HealthWorks, peer educators provide aid to students throughout pandemic | University Park Campus News

Staying healthy has become more important than ever before at Penn State — both mentally and physically. While they’re not a stranger to campus, the university’s HealthWorks is striving to keep students at their best.

From stress and sleep to nutrition, HealthWorks provides students with a variety of health aid.

Penn State’s HealthWorks is a group of peer educators who are co-led by Katelyn Quick, a clinical dietician for Penn State Health Promotion and Wellness, and Erin Raupers, assistant director for Penn State Health Promotion and Wellness.

Split into two categories with peer educators, Quick focuses on outreach while Raupers takes on one-on-one student appointments. The overall goal for the program is to empower students to engage in healthy behavior and to advocate for a healthy Penn State community.

“I really feel strongly that health and wellness has to do with a holistic, whole-body approach,” Quick said.

Now held via

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Why Mom of Texas Boy, 11, Who Died of Suspected Hypothermia Says She ‘Can’t’ Return to Home Where He Died

GoFundMe Cristian Pavon Pineda

The mother of a Texas boy, believed to have died in his sleep of hypothermia after his home lost power due to an unprecedented winter storm, is struggling to understand how the happy, healthy son she kissed goodnight on Monday is now gone.

On Tuesday morning, just hours after playing in the snow for the first time in his young life, Cristian Pavon Pineda, 11, was found unresponsive under a pile of blankets.

“When he saw the snow, he was happy,” his mother, Maria Elisa Pineda, who moved to Texas from Honduras over two years ago, recalls to PEOPLE in Spanish.

“He slammed a door and the snow fell on his head and he was laughing so much. We were taking all these photos of him in the snow,” she adds of her son.

After playing outside, Pineda says her son went to bed around 10

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This Start-Up Is Looking at the Future of Senior Living, Aging in Place

The most common options for single, healthy seniors are to either live alone, move into an institutional senior living facility, or move in with family.

Each option can present issues. Living alone can lead to loneliness-related health issues; institutional living is too expensive for most families; and moving in with family can put an additional burden on children now raising their own families.

UpsideHoM is building a new model to tackle some of these issues, and they’re calling it a “deconstructed” senior living facility.

Baby boomers and senior living

Driven largely by the coronavirus pandemic, senior living occupancy rates are shrinking, while inventory growth has also slowed. Less people are living in senior housing, and the capacity of senior living is topping out — all while boomers continue to age.

According to a report from the University of Chicago, by 2029 less than half of middle-income seniors in

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At-risk Californian feels left behind in COVID vaccine rollout

Some say the coronavirus vaccine can’t come fast enough.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — As California health officials aim to speed up the coronavirus vaccination program, which has been criticized by the Governor and other officials for moving too slowly, some in the state feel like they’re being left behind.

Dennis Haight, 61, of Yuba County is wondering why some healthy people can receive the vaccine before him. He suffers from numerous health conditions that make him high risk for getting very sick from coronavirus.

“I have a brain tumor, I have COPD, I have diabetes, pancreatitis,” Haight said.

As many as 6 million Californians are in the same group as him. This group of very high-risk people is eligible for the coronavirus vaccine starting March 15.

RELATED: California to expand COVID-19 vaccines to people ages 16-64 with high-risk health conditions

Ahead of them in the state’s vaccine rollout, are some 15

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