The #1 Danger Sign You’re Developing Liver Disease, Says Science

The liver is one of the body’s most crucial organs, responsible for detoxifying the blood, metabolizing macronutrients, and producing chemicals that enable essential bodily processes. And during this pandemic, many of us are not treating it properly: “Although national figures are not available, admissions for alcoholic liver disease at Keck Hospital of the University of Southern California were up 30% in 2020 compared with 2019, said Dr. Brian Lee, a transplant hepatologist who treats the condition in alcoholics,” reports Kaiser Health News. “There’s been a tremendous influx,” Dr. Haripriya Maddur, a hepatologist at Northwestern Medicine, told the website. Read on to see the #1 danger sign—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You May Have Already Had COVID.

Middle aged woman suffering from abdominal pain while sitting on bed at home

Middle aged woman suffering from abdominal pain while sitting on bed at home

If your liver isn’t functioning properly, it can

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Take on fatty liver disease with healthy eating | Feature Columnist

Keep your immune system strong by eating healthy, being physically active, getting enough sleep, managing your stress and please wear a face covering. Join the Brody medical students at September’s “Walk with a Doc” at Lake Laupus. This month’s guest speaker is Dr. Jason Higginson, executive dean of the Brody School of Medicine. He will make a few comments and lead the walk around the lake. All are welcome at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 25.

Q My doctor says I have NAFLD. I don’t understand since I never drink alcohol. He told me to lose weight. Is there a special diet I should follow? — JL, Winterville.

A You received a diagnosis that confuses many people, but it is a condition you can do something about with lifestyle changes. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), like other chronic medical conditions linked to obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes, is

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Coffee reduces risk of liver disease, cancer: BMC Public Health study

Drinking three to four cups of coffee a day may reduce your risk of liver cancer and other alcohol-related liver diseases, according to a new study. 

Researchers looked at the coffee habits of more than 494,000 people in the UK Biobank, a biomedical database, and monitored their liver health over 11 years.

Participants ranged from 40 to 69 years old, with 384,818 saying they were avid coffee drinkers, and 109,767 saying they were not. People who drank ground caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee saw the most benefits, while some reduction in risks was also found in instant coffee drinkers.

Coffee drinkers were 21% less likely to develop chronic liver disease, 20% less likely to develop chronic or fatty liver disease, and 49% less likely to die of chronic liver disease than non-coffee drinkers, according to the study published Monday in the peer-reviewed journal BMC Public Health.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is

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