Need for liver transplants due to heavy drinking soared during pandemic, study says

The need for liver transplants because of heavy drinking soared during the pandemic, researchers reported Tuesday.They found the number of people who got a liver transplant or were put on a waiting list due to alcoholic hepatitis was 50% higher than what was forecast based on pre-pandemic trends.With alcoholic hepatitis, the liver stops processing alcohol and instead creates highly toxic chemicals that trigger inflammation. The inflammation can kill off healthy liver cells, creating irreversible damage to the liver that may force the patient to get a liver transplant to survive.Alcoholic hepatitis is a condition that often develops after years of heavy drinking, but it can also develop after a short period of excess. Scientists still don’t know why some people develop this condition and others don’t.For this study, University of Michigan researchers compared the actual number of new people put on the U.S. organ transplant list from March 2020 to … Read More

Need for liver transplants due to heavy drinking soared during pandemic, study finds

They found the number of people who got a liver transplant or were put on a waiting list due to alcoholic hepatitis was 50% higher than what was forecast based on pre-pandemic trends.

With alcoholic hepatitis, the liver stops processing alcohol and instead creates highly toxic chemicals that trigger inflammation. The inflammation can kill off healthy liver cells, creating irreversible damage to the liver that may force the patient to get a liver transplant to survive.

Alcoholic hepatitis is a condition that often develops after years of heavy drinking, but it can also develop after a short period of excess. Scientists still don’t know why some people develop this condition and others don’t.

For this study, University of Michigan researchers compared the actual number of new people put on the US organ transplant list from March 2020 to January 2021 with the projected numbers that were based on pre-pandemic data.

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Decision due on measures to cut Rio Blanco County wild horse count | Western Colorado

The Bureau of Land Management next week is expected to issue a decision on whether to pursue a long-term plan for reducing wild horse numbers through a variety measures, including helicopter roundups, bait trapping and fertility control treatment, in a herd management area in Rio Blanco County about 50 miles north and east of Grand Junction.

The agency estimates that 838 horses currently live in the Piceance-East Douglas Herd Management Area generally in central Rio Blanco County east of Colorado Highway 139 and south of Colorado Highway 64. The BLM has a target management level of 135-235 wild horses there, which it says would maintain a thriving ecological balance and healthy rangelands in keeping with the agency’s multiple-use mission for the area.

Some 400 more wild horses live west of Highway 139 on acreage not designated as a herd management area, where the BLM’s goal is to have no wild

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