Christus breaks ground on Longview surgical hospital, orthopedics institute | Local News

Christus Good Shepherd Health System on Tuesday broke ground on a $35 million project that will see an expansion of the NorthPark campus in Longview as well as the creation of the city’s first integrated orthopedics and sports medicine institute.

The project, which will be completed in 2022 and 2023, will transform the existing Institute for Healthy Living into the new Christus Good Shepherd Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute and add 27,000-square-feet of space, including dedicated operating rooms for orthopedic surgical procedures, at NorthPark. The Institute for Healthy Living will continue to serve as a community gym, but will expand its hours of operation to 24 hours a day and will be integrated into the recovery process on the orthopedic and sports medicine services offerings at the facility.

The new Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Institute will work seamlessly with NorthPark to offer a complete scope of services, allowing Christus to

Read More

Consenting for treatment in advance to reduce leaving the hospital against medical advice among patients with addiction

drug addict
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Patients with substance use disorders (SUDs) being treated for serious medical conditions are more likely to leave the hospital against medical advice (AMA) than those without addiction. A special type of contract with healthcare providers might enable patients to consent in advance to life-saving medical care—even if they later refuse treatment, according to a commentary in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).

The Substance Use Advance Directive (SUAD) “has the potential to greatly improve the current state of treatment for life-threatening comorbid conditions in SUD patients through reducing AMA discharges,” writes Paul Tobias, MD, JD, MBA, of Ohio Health, Columbus.

But in an accompanying commentary, Kelly K. Dineen, JD, Ph.D., of Creighton University, Omaha, Neb., cites “obvious practical and ethical challenges” to the SUAD concept, including the lack of any legal basis for overruling patients

Read More