At 4.7% CAGR, Trends of Disposable Medical Supplies Market Reviewed with Industry forecast to 2025

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Jan 25, 2021 (Market Insight Reports) —
Selbyville, Delaware. The research report on Disposable Medical Supplies Market is an analysis and information corresponding to market segments such as geographies, product type, application, and end-use industry. Experts use the most recent Disposable Medical Supplies Market research techniques and tools to assemble widespread and precise marketing research reports. A detailed outline about Disposable Medical Supplies market size and share were combined in this report which gives a comprehensive analysis of different verticals of businesses.

As per a recent report added by Market Study Report LLC, the Disposable Medical Supplies Market is anticipated to record its name in the billion-dollar space within seven years, by exceeding a revenue of 246700 million by 2025, with an anticipated CAGR of 4.7%.

The report has been prepared based on the synthesis, analysis, and

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With COVID-19 vaccine supplies tight, Truman Medical Centers cancels some appointments

Feb. 1—Truman Medical Centers has the capacity to administer more than 2,500 COVID-19 shots every day, and has appointments scheduled into March.

But sometime Monday afternoon, Truman expects to run out of its allotment and won’t be administering first doses again until late Tuesday or early Wednesday, when another shipment is expected.

People who were set to get their first shot Tuesday will be rescheduled and bound to be frustrated. So is Charlie Shields, Truman Medical’s president and CEO.

“One of the biggest constraints that we have right now is simply the availability of vaccine,” he told Jackson County legislators Monday.

Bridgette Shaffer, director of the Jackson County Health Department, shares the same frustration, she told legislators. Last week, her department received no vaccine for first doses of the two-shot regimen, and she doesn’t expect any this week, either.

“At the pace our community is receiving the vaccine,” according

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How This Medical Supplies Company Is Helping Substance Abuse Center In North Carolina Get Back To Work During COVID-19

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Kevin McDonald served as the president and CEO of TROSA (short for Triangle Residential Options for Substance Abusers) from its inception in the early 90’s until stepping aside from his duties last July due to health concerns. After 26 years, McDonald’s legacy has helped aid in the recovery of hundreds of people faced with substance abuse problems. Based in Durham, North Carolina, TROSA is a licensed treatment facility which helps individuals with substance use disorders become healthy and productive members of their communities, neighborhoods, and families.

Founded in 1994, the organization launched from the Old North Durham Elementary with 30 residents has become one of the premiere outreach programs and facilities throughout North Carolina thanks

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Drones will deliver medical supplies to remote First Nations during COVID-19 pandemic

The University of British Columbia (UBC) Faculty of Medicine received a $750,000 dollar grant to deliver health care supplies to the remote First Nations communities using drones.

The Remote Communities Drone Transport Initiative received money from the 2020 TD Ready Challenge to deliver personal protective equipment and medications, as well as COVID-19 testing and diagnostics during the ongoing pandemic.

“It’s an opportunity whereby we can explore the use of drone technology to support remote Indigenous communities in a new way,” says Dr. John Pawlovich, one of the project’s leaders.

“Drone technology has been around for a while now, but hasn’t been thoroughly explored, in terms of potential to augment healthcare initiatives for indigenous communities.”

When 82 First Nations in B.C went into lock-down last April, many cut off access to their communities to prevent the spread of COVID-19, but they also cut off their own supply lines, according to a

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