Following freezer failure, nurses rush out 1,300 COVID-19 vaccines to anyone available

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle hospitals rushed out COVID-19 vaccines to hundreds of people in the middle of the night after a freezer they were being stored in failed.

It’s not clear what caused the freezer failure Thursday night, but the UW Medical Center’s Northwest and Montlake campuses and Swedish Medical Center received more than 1,300 doses that needed to be used before they expired at 5:30 a.m. Friday, The Seattle Times reported.

Word of the unexpected doses spread on social media, and a line of hopeful vaccine recipients snaked out the clinic door and through a parking lot at UW Medical Center-Northwest. A hundred people lined up at Swedish Medical Center’s clinic at Seattle University. The hospital tweeted at 11:59 p.m. that it had 588 doses to give out,

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Beverly Hills doctor sentenced, ordered to pay $2.9M in restitution for massive medical insurance scam

A Beverly Hills doctor who authorities say performed unnecessary surgeries on patients in one of the nation’s largest medical insurance fraud schemes was sentenced Friday.

Dr. Mario Rosenberg pleaded no contest in 2014 to felony insurance fraud and was given three years of probation and ordered to perform 1,000 hours of community service and pay $2.9 million in restitution, the Orange County Register reported.

Rosenberg and others recruited healthy people to undergo surgeries in exchange for money or low-cost cosmetic procedures such as “tummy tucks,” prosecutors said.

Health insurers were then billed for unnecessary and dangerous procedures, which included hysterectomies and colonoscopies, prosecutors alleged.

They said more than 2,800 people were recruited and Rosenberg and two other doctors performed more than 1,000 surgeries. The scam was centered at a now-closed surgical outpatient clinic in Buena Park.

The $154 million scheme ended in 2008 with 19 people being indicted. At the

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How This Medical Supplies Company Is Helping Substance Abuse Center In North Carolina Get Back To Work During COVID-19

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Kevin McDonald served as the president and CEO of TROSA (short for Triangle Residential Options for Substance Abusers) from its inception in the early 90’s until stepping aside from his duties last July due to health concerns. After 26 years, McDonald’s legacy has helped aid in the recovery of hundreds of people faced with substance abuse problems. Based in Durham, North Carolina, TROSA is a licensed treatment facility which helps individuals with substance use disorders become healthy and productive members of their communities, neighborhoods, and families.

Founded in 1994, the organization launched from the Old North Durham Elementary with 30 residents has become one of the premiere outreach programs and facilities throughout North Carolina thanks

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Consenting for treatment in advance to reduce leaving the hospital against medical advice among patients with addiction

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Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Patients with substance use disorders (SUDs) being treated for serious medical conditions are more likely to leave the hospital against medical advice (AMA) than those without addiction. A special type of contract with healthcare providers might enable patients to consent in advance to life-saving medical care—even if they later refuse treatment, according to a commentary in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).

The Substance Use Advance Directive (SUAD) “has the potential to greatly improve the current state of treatment for life-threatening comorbid conditions in SUD patients through reducing AMA discharges,” writes Paul Tobias, MD, JD, MBA, of Ohio Health, Columbus.

But in an accompanying commentary, Kelly K. Dineen, JD, Ph.D., of Creighton University, Omaha, Neb., cites “obvious practical and ethical challenges” to the SUAD concept, including the lack of any legal basis for overruling patients

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