Newly launched medical truck brings the emergency room to cardiac arrest patients

University of Minnesota, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and health care system partners announce the launch of a truck outfitted with medical equipment and virtual reality technology to help experts attend to patients remotely for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Part of the Minnesota Mobile Resuscitation Consortium (MMRC), the truck brings the emergency room to cardiac arrest patients and is an innovative step in providing care to cardiac arrest patients who need to be placed on ECMO.

This approach will allow experts to administer treatment on-site in the vehicle — shortening the time to treatment and broadening the area served by MMRC. Every 10-minute delay in treatment for these patients increases the chances of mortality by 15 to 25%. This technology and community partnership aims to save the lives of cardiac arrest patients in scenarios which traditional resuscitation efforts have failed.”


Jason Bartos, President,

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State fines OneShare Health, bans it from selling insurance in Washington state

Feb. 2—The state Insurance Commissioner’s Office has fined OneShare Health $150,000 and is prohibiting the company from selling insurance in the state of Washington.

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Additionally, OneShare dropped a federal lawsuit against Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler.

“People who are looking for health insurance should closely examine any offerings and contact our consumer advocates if they have questions about products that market themselves as health care sharing ministries,” Kreidler said in a statement.

OneShare Health fails to meet the legal definition of a health care sharing ministry. It enrolled more than 7,000 members in Washington who paid a total of $12 million in monthly premiums that OneShare called “contributions.” Six members have complained to Kreidler’s office about unpaid claims.

A legitimate health care sharing ministry is a nonprofit organization whose members have a common set of ethical or religious beliefs and share medical expenses consistent with those beliefs. Health care

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Researchers develop injection to treat skin cancer

Yale researchers develop injection to treat skin cancer
Bioadhesive nanoparticles (white) after being taken up by skin cancer tumor cells during in virtro culture. Credit: Julia Lewis

Yale researchers are developing a skin cancer treatment that involves injecting nanoparticles into the tumor, killing cancer cells with a two-pronged approach, as a potential alternative to surgery.

The results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“For a lot of patients, treating skin cancer is much more involved than it would be if there was a way to effectively treat them with a simple procedure like an injection,” said Dr. Michael Girardi, professor and vice chair of dermatology at Yale Medical School and senior author of the study. “That’s always been a holy grail in dermatology—to find a simpler way to treat skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.”

For the treatment, tumors are injected with polymer-based nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy

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