Need for liver transplants due to heavy drinking soared during pandemic, study says

The need for liver transplants because of heavy drinking soared during the pandemic, researchers reported Tuesday.They found the number of people who got a liver transplant or were put on a waiting list due to alcoholic hepatitis was 50% higher than what was forecast based on pre-pandemic trends.With alcoholic hepatitis, the liver stops processing alcohol and instead creates highly toxic chemicals that trigger inflammation. The inflammation can kill off healthy liver cells, creating irreversible damage to the liver that may force the patient to get a liver transplant to survive.Alcoholic hepatitis is a condition that often develops after years of heavy drinking, but it can also develop after a short period of excess. Scientists still don’t know why some people develop this condition and others don’t.For this study, University of Michigan researchers compared the actual number of new people put on the U.S. organ transplant list from March 2020 to … Read More

Need for liver transplants due to heavy drinking soared during pandemic, study finds

They found the number of people who got a liver transplant or were put on a waiting list due to alcoholic hepatitis was 50% higher than what was forecast based on pre-pandemic trends.

With alcoholic hepatitis, the liver stops processing alcohol and instead creates highly toxic chemicals that trigger inflammation. The inflammation can kill off healthy liver cells, creating irreversible damage to the liver that may force the patient to get a liver transplant to survive.

Alcoholic hepatitis is a condition that often develops after years of heavy drinking, but it can also develop after a short period of excess. Scientists still don’t know why some people develop this condition and others don’t.

For this study, University of Michigan researchers compared the actual number of new people put on the US organ transplant list from March 2020 to January 2021 with the projected numbers that were based on pre-pandemic data.

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Atlanta food forest becomes a resource for those in need amid the pandemic

Millions of Americans live in food deserts across the country, places known to be without affordable and healthy food options. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that 19 million people in the U.S. are more than 1 mile from the nearest grocery store in urban areas, and more than 10 miles away from a grocery store in a rural area. 

Free food forests are popping up across the country to combat this problem. The largest free food forest in the nation is in an Atlanta community that needs it most.

Browns Mill food forest sits on more than 7 acres of land. Years from now, the land will produce tons of fruits and vegetables for the community.

Celeste Lomax, food forest volunteer and community member, said her community has lacked healthy food for years.

Celeste Lomax describes the 7 acres of land that the Browns Mill Forest sits on. (Source/FNC Jayla Whitfield) 

Celeste Lomax describes the 7 acres of land that the Browns Mill Forest sits

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How Penn State HealthWorks, peer educators provide aid to students throughout pandemic | University Park Campus News

Staying healthy has become more important than ever before at Penn State — both mentally and physically. While they’re not a stranger to campus, the university’s HealthWorks is striving to keep students at their best.

From stress and sleep to nutrition, HealthWorks provides students with a variety of health aid.

Penn State’s HealthWorks is a group of peer educators who are co-led by Katelyn Quick, a clinical dietician for Penn State Health Promotion and Wellness, and Erin Raupers, assistant director for Penn State Health Promotion and Wellness.

Split into two categories with peer educators, Quick focuses on outreach while Raupers takes on one-on-one student appointments. The overall goal for the program is to empower students to engage in healthy behavior and to advocate for a healthy Penn State community.

“I really feel strongly that health and wellness has to do with a holistic, whole-body approach,” Quick said.

Now held via

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